Sunday, May 20, 2018

Vechir na Ivana Kupala / The Eve of Ivan Kupalo (Bio Rex 70 mm)


Вечір на Івана Купала / The Eve of Ivan Kupalo. Boris Khmelnitski (Petro) and Larisa Kadochnikova (Pidorka). Their love defies gravity.

Вечір на Івана Купала [in Ukrainian] / Вечер накануне Ивана Купалы / Vecher nakanune Ivana Kupaly [in Russian] / Vetshir na Ivana Kupala / Vetsher nakanune Ivana Kupaly / [Juhannusaatto] / La Nuit de la veille de la Saint-Jean / Der Abend vor dem Fest Iwan Kupala.
    SU 1968. Year of release: 1969. PC: Kinostudii im. Oleksandra Dovzhenka / A. P. Dovzhenko Film Studios (Kiev). P: David Janover. D: Juri Iljenko / Yuri Ilyenko.
    SC: Juri Iljenko – based on the short story «Вечір проти Івана Купала» (1830) by Nikolai Gogol in his collection Вечори на хуторі біля Диканьки  / Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka. The short story in Finnish: ”Juhannusaatto” / ”Juhannusyö” / ”Ivan Kupalon yö” in Dikankan iltoja.
    CIN: Vadim Iljenko / Vadim Ilyenko. PD: Pjotr Maksimenko / Pyotr Maksimenko, Valeri Novakov. Art sketches (eskiz hudozhnika): V. Leventalja. Art decorations: Mikla Tereshtshenko. Set dec: Sergei Brzhestovsky / Sergei Brzhestovski. Scenery paintings: V. Lemport, Elizaveta Mironova. SFX: Volodimir Tsiplin. Cost: Lidija Baikova / Lidiya Bajkova. Makeup: Jakov Grinberg. M: Leonid Grabovski. S: Leonid Vatshi / Leonid Vachi. ED: Natalia Pishthsikova.
    C: Boris Hmelnitski / Boris Khmelnitski (Petro / Piotr), Larisa Kadotshnikova / Larisa Kadochnikova (Pidorka), Juhim Fridman / Efim Fridman / Yefim Fridman (Basavrjuk / Bassavruk), Dmitri Franko (Korzh), Sasha Sergienko / Aleksandr Sergienko (Ivas), Konstantin Ershov (priest), David Janover / David Yanover (landlord), Dzhemma Firsova (Mikosha) (witch), Nikolai Silis (innkeeper), Borislav Brondukov, Mihailo Iljenko / Mykhailo Ilyenko, Viktor Pantshenko / Viktor Panchenko (masked men), S. Pidlisna.
    Original in Ukrainian. Released also in a Russian dubbed version
    USSR release: 27 Jan 1969. Reportedly released only on 70 mm.
    The film was not released in Finland – 70 min
    SEA screening 26.9.1987 at President of a Gosfilmofond print in 70 mm.
    70 mm Gosfilmofond print (dubbed in Russian) with e-subtitles translated by Pentti Stranius (1987) and operated by Mia Öhman screened at Bio Rex (Nikolai Gogol, The Crazy Year 1968) 20 May 2018
   
Plot summary of Gogol's story in English Wikipedia: ”There lived a Cossack named Korzh, his daughter Pidorka and his worker Petro. Petro and Pidorka fall in love, but Korzh catches them one day kissing and is about to whip Petro for this, but stops when his son Ivas pleads for his father to not beat the worker. Korzh instead takes him outside and tells him to never come to his home again, putting the lovers into despair. Petro wants to do whatever he can to get her, and meets up with Basavriuk, a local stranger who frequents the village and many believe to be the devil himself. Basavriuk tells Petro to meet him in Bear’s Ravine and he’ll show him where treasure is in order to get back Pidorka.”

”He has to find a fern that blooms on Kupala Night, a folk legend not based in fact. Basavriuk tells Petro to pluck the flower he finds, and a witch appears who hands him a spade. When he finds the treasure with the spade, he cannot open it until he sheds blood, which he agrees to do until he finds that they captured Ivas in order to acquire it. He refuses at first but in a fury of uncertainty lops off the child’s head and gets the gold. He falls asleep for two days and when he awakens he sees the gold but cannot remember how he got it. After they are married, things go downhill and Petro becomes increasingly distant and insane, thinking all the time that he has forgotten something. Eventually, after a time, Pidorka is convinced to visit the witch at Bear’s Ravine for help, and brings her home. Petro then remembers, upon seeing her, what happened and tosses an axe at the witch, who disappears. Ivas appears at the door with blood all over him and Petro is carried away by the devil. All that remains is a pile of ashes where he once stood and the gold has turned into pieces of broken pottery.”

”After this, Basavriuk begins to appear in the village again and Pidorka goes on a pilgrimage. Foma’s grandfather’s aunt still had problems with the devil however; a party is ruined when a roast lamb comes alive, a chalice bows to his grandfather and a bowl begins to dance. Even after sprinkling the entire area with holy water the tavern is still possessed, so the village becomes abandoned.


As a straggler in our Nikolai Gogol retrospective we screened The Eve of Ivan Kupalo based on short stories from Gogol's youth in a collection called Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka.

We postponed this screening to this date because the only 70 mm cinema in Finland, Bio Rex, re-opened this weekend.

Made on what seems like a solid budget, The Eve of Ivan Kupalo looks gorgeous and extravagant. Modern bloggers compare it with films by Dario Argento and Alejandro Jodorowsky.

But the background of this film is fully Ukrainian and Russian. It has not only been produced by the Dovzhenko studios but it has also a true affinity with the films of Alexander Dovzhenko such as Zvenigora. Dovzhenko was a key inspiration for Andrei Tarkovsky, and Tarkovsky influenced Sergei Paradzhanov who came on his own thanks to his Tarkovsky epiphany. Paradzhanov's first completely original masterpiece was Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors which also started the second great wave of Ukrainian poetic cinema. Paradzhanov's cinematographer was Yuri Ilyenko, who simultaneously proved his mastery as a film director in A Spring for the Thirsty.

The Eve of Ivan Kupalo is Ilyenko's wildest film, a Midsummer Night dream phantasmagoria which goes much further than Shakespeare film adaptations and makes Nordic midnight sun escapades look tame. It is an art film like Paradzhanov's Sayat Nova, an experimental film, and a major psychedelic film.

In the crazy year 1968 psychedelia was on display everywhere: from visions of the future (2001 A Space Odyssey, a favourite film of John Lennon's) to visionary intepretations of folklore (The Eve of Ivan Kupalo).

The Eve of Ivan Kupalo is quite a trip. The young cossack Petro sells his soul to the devil to win a treasure so that he can marry his beloved Pidorka. But vodka makes Petro delirious and he burns alive. Pidorka tries to revive his ashes. The Orphic quest is reversed as here it is the woman who tries to retrieve her beloved from the beyond.

The grand phantasmagoria contains visions of Catherine the Great, Potemkin villages, charges of Crimean Tatars, changing seasons, forests shining with glow-worms, crawfish carrying small candles, torrents of autumn leaves, red-nippled snowwomen, sequences in blue-green colour negative, bold colour washes, and flashes of lightings. Tableau shots, handheld footage, aerial views, whip pans and jump cuts are among the devices.

The Eve of Ivan Kupalo is a lyrical film but it has also an epic dimension. We are constantly aware of people moving in immense steppes and along the mighty Dniepr River, as well as in gorgeous hill landscapes observed in distant views.

Originally The Eve of Ivan Kupalo was put in restricted release, and abroad it became possible to access only during the glasnost. That is when we screened it for the first time, too. I included the film in my centenary of the cinema Film Guide (a guide to the 1000 best films of all times, 1995).

The colour of the print feels authentic to the period. The image is not the sharpest possible, and the Russian dubbing feels slightly alienating, but anyway this is a breathtaking viewing experience. The Eve of Ivan Kupalo is a forgotten masterpiece. Hardly anyone in the audience seemed to know it, and the reception was enthusiastic.

It is a story about a great love that defies gravity, madness and death.

OUR PROGRAM NOTE OF 1987 BY PENTTI STRANIUS:
OUR PROGRAM NOTE OF 1987 BY PENTTI STRANIUS:

Nikolai Gogolin (1809–1852) varhaistuotantoon, Dikankan tarinoihin kuuluva ”Juhannusaatto” on kirjailijan novellilleen antaman alaotsikon mukaan ”Erään lukkarin kertoma tosijuttu”. Tätä ukrainalaista romanttisvoittoista kauhutarinaa ohjaaja-käsikirjoittaja-kuvaaja Juri Iljenko (1936–2010) on käyttänyt pohjana samannimisessä elokuvassaan Juhannusaatto. Se on Iljenkon toinen ohjaus, mutta sai aikanaan saman kohtalon kuin ensimmäinenkin, Lähde janoaville (1965) – ne vaiettiin niin kuoliaIksi, että ukrainalainen runollinen elokuva oli saada lyhyen lopun. Vasta Mustalla merkitty valkea lintu (1972) nosti Iljenkon hänelle kuuluvalle paikalle Neuvostoliiton elokuvaohjaajien joukossa.

Juhannusaatto on ukrainalaisen kansantaruston ja gogolilaisen satiirisen kauhuromantiikan nerokasta elokuvallista hyödyntämistä. Äänen, värin ja kuvan yhteensovittaminen onnistuu Iljenkolla tavalla, josta taiteellisten musiikkivideoiden tekijöillä, nyt 20 vuotta myöhemmin, on paljon opittavaa. Vaikka Juhannusaatto olisikin tarkoitettu pelkäksi vitsikkäääksi ilotteluksi, se on silti ehyt rytminen kokonaisuus – ei kokeellinen pitkitetty video. Sitä paitsi kuva-asetelmiltaan elokuva on kuin Marc Chagallin maalaustaide – olkoonkin että Chagall oli kotoisin Valko-Venäjän Vitebskistä ja Gogol ja Iljenko Ukrainasta.

Gogolin Juhannusaatosta Iljenko on ottanut lähes suoraan alkupuolen dialogin ja perusasetelman: kahden nuoren onnettoman rakkaustarinan. Nuori kasakka, maankiertäjä Petro myy sielunsa paholaiselle hankkiakseen kulta-aarteen, jolla voi ostaa mieleisensä morsion, Pidorkan. Mutta paholaisen palvelemisesta joutuu maksamaan kovan hinnan. Petro juo aivonsa pellolle ja haihtuu viimein manalaan. Petron hulluutta kuvatessaan Iljenko hehkuttaa kankaalle toinen toistaan hurjempia psykedeelisiä näkyjä, surrealismia lähenteleviä eläinasetelmia, estottoman pakanallisia ääniefektejä. Elokuva Juhannusaatto kuten Gogolin ukrainalaisnovellitkin on täynnä siankärsiä, koirankuonoja, pukinnaamoja, kukonnokkia, hevosenturpia – juominkeja, noituutta, taikauskoa, taras bulbia ja tummakulmaisia ja -kutrisia kaunottaria.

Pidorka, hyvyyden vertauskuva, rakastaa Petroaan niin että on valmis yrittämään tämän herättämistä kuolleista ”jumalanäitiä itkettämällä”. Ja kun Juhannusaaton loppupuolen huipentumassa itketetään joukolla jumalanäiti-ikonia, ollaan samalla lähellä karmeaa arkipäivän todellisuutta. Tsaari-Venäjällä papit olivat mestareita valuttamaan vettä Neitsyt Marian silmistä, seurakuntalaistensa parhaaksi ja uskon vakuudeksi tietenkin. Ikonit itkivät ”aidosti”.

Juhannusaatto, tosijuttu, on paras kätkeä tajunnan pohjattomaan hissikuiluun. Muuten se toistuu unissa, elämässä. Tahattomasti ja taatusti väärissä yhteyksissä. Vai oletko koskaan nähnyt rakastavaisten pyörivän seinillä? Palavia kynttilöitä selässään kantavien rapujen mönkivän permannolla?

Nyt näet.

”Tunnetko Ukrainan yön? Etkö? Katsele sitä sitten tarkoin. Kuu pälyilee maata keskitaivaalta, se loistaa ja hengittää. Ilma on yhtä aikaa ihmeellisen kuulas, viileä ja painostava. Jumalainen yö! Lumoava yö! Kylä mäellä on kuin taiottu, kalkitut mökkien seinät hohtavat yhä valkoisempina. Laulu on vaiennut. Kaikki on hiljaista. Neitseelliset piikkipaatsamat ja tuomet työntävät peloissaan juuriaan kylmään lähdevetoon. Onko mahdollista, että yössä, maan päällä vaeltaisi sellaisia kerskureita, jotka eivät uskoisi noitiin ja paholaiseen”

Nikolai Gogol: Dikankan tarinoita, 1831–1832, suom. eri yhteyksistä – P.S.)

– Pentti Stranius Suomen ensimmäiseen arkistoesitykseen  26.9.1987

UKRAINIAN WIKIPEDIA:

Вечір на Івана Купала
Жанр     драма
Режисер     Юрій Іллєнко
Сценарист     Юрій Іллєнко
На основі     «Вечір проти Івана Купала» Миколи Гоголя
У головних ролях    
Борис Хмельницький
Лариса Кадочникова
Оператор     Вадим Іллєнко
Композитор     Леонід Грабовський
Монтаж     Наталія Пищикова
Художник     Петро Максименко, Валерій Новаков
Кінокомпанія     кіностудії ім. Олександра Довженка
Тривалість     1:11:36
Мова     українська
Країна     СРСР СРСР
Рік     1968
Дата виходу     27 січня 1969
IMDb     ID 0144187
Рейтинг     IMDb: 7.1/10 stars

«Вечір на Івана Купала» — український радянський художній фільм-драма кіностудії ім. Олександра Довженка 1968 року. Варіації на теми оповідань Миколи Гоголя та українських народних казок. Режисер — Юрій Іллєнко.

На одному хуторі жив молодий бідний селянин Петро, що підробляв у багатого хазяїна Коржа. Він закохався в доньку хазяїна, а дівчина відповіла хлопцю взаємністю. Але батько категорично відмовляється віддавати доньку заміж за батрака. Петро з горя йде в шинок, де зустрічається з бродягою Басаврюком, якого місцеві вважають дияволом у людській подобі. Басаврюк пропонує Петрові угоду — хлопець допоможе бродязі, а натомість той підкаже, як Петрові отримати красуню в дружини…

В ролях

    Лариса Кадочникова — Підорка
    Борис Хмельницький — Петро
    Юхим Фрідман — Басаврюк
    Дмитро Франько — Корж
    Борислав Брондуков — ряджений
    Михайло Іллєнко — ряджений
    Віктор Панченко — ряджений
    Давид Яновер — пан
    Костянтин Єршов — піп
    Джемма Фірсова (Мікоша) — відьма
    С. Підлісна
    Микола Силіс — шинкар
    Сашко Сергієнко — Івась
    В епізодах: І. Вихристюк, Георгій Дюльгеров, Людмила Колесник, В. Лисицин, В. Лемпорт, Н. Манзій, С. Михай, І. Мілютенко, В. Саунін, М. Чинкуров, Сергій Якутович; сліпі та вершники — жителі села Бучак

Творча група

    Сценарист та режисер-постановник: Юрій Іллєнко
    Оператор-постановник: Вадим Іллєнко
    Ескізи художника В. Левенталя
    Композитор: Леонід Грабовський
    Звукооператор: Леонід Вачі
    Художники-постановники: Петро Максименко, Валерій Новаков
    Художник-декоратор: Микола Терещенко
    Художник по костюмах: Лідія Байкова
    Розпис декорацій: В. Лемпорт, Єлизавета Миронова
    Режисер: Людмила Колесник
    Оператор: Вілен Калюта
    Художник-гример: Яків Грінберг
    Редактор: Юрій Пархоменко
    Монтажер: Наталія Пищикова
    Асистенти режисера: Емілія Іллєнко, Л. Кустова, І. Мілютенко, Георгій Дюльгеров
    Асистенти оператора: О. Найда, Майя Степанова, Ю. Тимощук
    Асистент художника: Сергій Бржестовський
    Художник комбінованих зйомок: Володимир Цирлін
    Оператор комбінованих зйомок: Г. Сигалов
    Директор картини: Давид Яновер

Вечер накануне Ивана Купала // Советские художественные фильмы. Аннотированный каталог (1968-1969). — М. : «Нива России», 1995. — С. 19. — 7000 прим.

UKRAINIAN WIKIPEDIA ON GOGOL'S SHORT STORY

Вечір проти Івана Купала
Матеріал з Вікіпедії — вільної енциклопедії.
Вечір проти Івана Купала
Вечер накануне Ивана Купала
Автор     Гоголь Микола Васильович
Мова     російська
Опубліковано     1830
Попередній твір     Сорочинський ярмарок (повість)
Наступний твір     Травнева ніч, або Утоплена

«Ве́чір про́ти Іва́на Купа́ла» — повість Миколи Гоголя з циклу «Вечори на хуторі біля Диканьки».

Історія публікації

Вперше була надрукована 1830 року в лютневому і березневому випусках «Вітчизняних записок» без підпису автора, під заголовком «Бісаврюк, або Вечір проти Івана Купала. Малоросійська повість (з народного переказу), розказана дячком Покровської церкви». Видавцем були внесені в неї численні правки. Цією обставиною пояснюється текст, що з'явився у передмові, який висміює від імені оповідача редакторське самоуправство. (переклад І. Сенченка)

Екранізована 1968 року Юрієм Іллєнком — фільм «Вечір на Івана Купала».

ENGLISH WIKIPEDIA ON GOGOL'S SHORT STORY

"St. John's Eve"
Author     Nikolai Gogol
Original title     "Вечер накануне Ивана Купала"
Translator     Isabel Florence Hapgood
Country     Russian Empire
Language     Russian
Series     Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka
Genre(s)     horror
Published in     Otechestvennye Zapiski
Publication type     literary magazine
Media type     Print (periodical)
Publication date     February–March 1830
Published in English     1886

"St. John's Eve" (Russian: Вечер накануне Ивана Купала; translit. Vecher nakanune Ivana Kupala) is the second tale in the collection Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka by Nikolai Gogol.[1] It was first published in 1830 in the literary Russian periodical Otechestvennye Zapiski in February and March issues, and in the book form in 1831.

Plot summary

This story is retold by Rudy Panko from Foma Grigorievich, the sexton of the Dikanka church. Rudy was in the middle of reading the story to the reader, when Foma butts in and demands to tell it his way. His grandfather used to live in an old village not far from Dikanka that no longer exists. There lived a Cossack named Korzh, his daughter Pidorka and his worker Petro. Petro and Pidorka fall in love, but Korzh catches them one day kissing and is about to whip Petro for this, but stops when his son Ivas pleads for his father to not beat the worker. Korzh instead takes him outside and tells him to never come to his home again, putting the lovers into despair. Petro wants to do whatever he can to get her, and meets up with Basavriuk, a local stranger who frequents the village and many believe to be the devil himself. Basavriuk tells Petro to meet him in Bear’s Ravine and he’ll show him where treasure is in order to get back Pidorka.

He has to find a fern that blooms on Kupala Night, a folk legend not based in fact. Basavriuk tells Petro to pluck the flower he finds, and a witch appears who hands him a spade. When he finds the treasure with the spade, he cannot open it until he sheds blood, which he agrees to do until he finds that they captured Ivas in order to acquire it. He refuses at first but in a fury of uncertainty lops off the child’s head and gets the gold. He falls asleep for two days and when he awakens he sees the gold but cannot remember how he got it. After they are married, things go downhill and Petro becomes increasingly distant and insane, thinking all the time that he has forgotten something. Eventually, after a time, Pidorka is convinced to visit the witch at Bear’s Ravine for help, and brings her home. Petro then remembers, upon seeing her, what happened and tosses an axe at the witch, who disappears. Ivas appears at the door with blood all over him and Petro is carried away by the devil. All that remains is a pile of ashes where he once stood and the gold has turned into pieces of broken pottery.

After this, Basavriuk begins to appear in the village again and Pidorka goes on a pilgrimage. Foma’s grandfather’s aunt still had problems with the devil however; a party is ruined when a roast lamb comes alive, a chalice bows to his grandfather and a bowl begins to dance. Even after sprinkling the entire area with holy water the tavern is still possessed, so the village becomes abandoned.

Significance

This short story was famously the main inspiration for the Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky's tone poem, Night on Bald Mountain, made known to the wider international audience by its use in Disney's Fantasia.

The story was adapted in an eponymous Ukrainian SSR movie directed by Yuri Ilyenko and featuring Larisa Kadochnikova and Boris Khmelnitsky in lead roles that was released in the Soviet Union in February 1969.

References

Susanne Fusso; Priscilla Meyer; Nikolaĭ Vasil (1992). Essays on Gogol: Logos and the Russian Word. Northwestern University Press. ISBN 0-8101-1191-8.

No comments: